Lemonsjø Fjellstue

Share:
Pinterest
LinkedIn
WhatsApp

Lemonsjø Fjellstue og Hyttegrend is comprised of cabins, apartments and hotel rooms for short and long term rental. Located on the second floor of the Lodge they have four comfortable hotel room with beautiful views over the lake and the mountains. Each room is comprised of a double bed, sitting area and en-suite bathroom. Our salon offers a cosy atmosphere with a traditional Norwegian fireplace the enjoy anytime for our guests.

©Lemonsjø Fjellstue
©Lemonsjø Fjellstue
©Lemonsjø Fjellstue
©Lemonsjø Fjellstue

Activities around Lemonsjø

Lemonsjø Fjellstue offers boat rental on five different mountain lakes, maps of hiking and biking trails in the area along the best local information. There are very good opportunities for swimming in the vicinity. A refreshing bath in crystal clear, pure water is always teasing. Fresh is a suitable term in any case. The water is hardly ever above 15°C even in summer. Near Lemonsjøen, on the river Rinda or near Tessesjøen you will find the best places.

Check with the reception for better descriptions and other tour suggestions.

Lemonsjø Lake- The North’s clearest lake

The name of the lodge comes from the nearby lake called Lemonsjø ( means “Lemon lake”), which is located on the hill south of Vågåvatnet, by riksveg 51. Lemonsjø is a very unique lake ; there are no obvious sources of inflows to the lake, only outflows . So why is the water level still stable? The reason behind this is that there are underground water sources at the bottom of the lake, providing a stable inflow of water. This phenomenon has several interesting consequences; first, during winter, even though the lake is covered in ice, there are a couple of open patches where the underground sources enter the lake, creating movement;secondly, the clean inflow sources is the reason why the lake is so clear and clean. There is no algae growth so yo can see the bottom of the lake 20 metres deep.

The name Lemon lake has many explanations, some more realistic than others. One explanation is that it comes from the name of the Norway lemming (lemen), and others say that in the 17th century a Scot lived and cultivated lemons in the area! The more probable explanation is that the name is linked to a tool that was used for fishing in that area. Over the years the name has changed, but the original name Hhlemhundr is the same as the tool used (hlemr).